Entry Doors: Elegant can be Efficient

Entry Doors: Elegant can be Efficient

POSTED ON in Global Blogs

Energy efficient entry doors can be elegantLike many other products, innovations in technology, design, and installation have increased energy efficiency for entry doors.

Energy efficient doors

If energy efficient exterior doors are high on your want list, here are some things to keep in mind:

Location — If your entry door faces constant, brutal summer sun or relentless winter gales, then insulation properties become a bigger concern than if the door will be more protected from the hot and cold weather.

Entry door location and energy efficient doors

Door Material — Steel and fiberglass-clad entry doors are usually packed with insulation and are energy efficient.

SEE ALSO: Compare entry door materials: fiberglass vs wood vs steel

Frame Material — Frames made of wood and fiberglass composite materials are excellent insulators because they resist conducting heat and cold into your home. Wood offers more options in the area of aesthetics while fiberglass is typically more durable and requires less maintenance.

Aluminum frames are inexpensive and durable, but they offer poorer insulation factors because they more readily conduct heat and cold than wood and fiberglass.  

SEE ALSO: FRONT ENTRY DOOR TYPES

Glass — Glass inserts in doors can enhance appearance and function of doors, but they typically reduce the door’s efficiency compared to the same door without glass. The good news is Pella offers energy efficient glass in their windows, and doors are no exception. Double-pane glass insulates almost twice as well as single-pane, while triple-pane glass provides additional energy efficiency. You can increase your window's energy efficiency by selecting Low-E (Low-Emissivity) glass coatings that reflect summer heat and winter cold and block harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays to help prevent fade damage. 

SEE ALSO: WHAT IS LOW E GLASS?

Installation — Imprecise installation can negate some of the insulation benefits of the door and frame. That’s why Pella certified installers work to minimize the amount of energy that escapes around the outer edges of the door and frame. 

Professional installation of energy efficient doors

Look for the Labels

For the greatest energy-saving potential, look for doors with these two labels: (graphic idea: labels)

  • ENERGY STAR® certified. This designation means the government has certified that the product meets or exceeds energy performance standards in your state.
  • The NFRC label. The National Fenestration Ratings Council (NFRC) is a nonprofit organization for the window industry that developed an energy rating system based on whole-unit product performance. It's the only reliable way to determine the entire door’s energy performance and compare products side-by-side.
  • The NFCR label contains a U-Factor rating and a Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) number. You want both numbers to be as low as possible.

To learn much more about energy efficient exterior doors, visit  your nearest Pella showroom.

SEE ALSO: HOW TO CHOOSE ENERGY EFFICIENT GLASS DOORS


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